On the North Beach in Bray there is an extremely interesting area of seashore where ancient tree trunks from the time of the Ice Age can be still be seen today sticking out of the seabed at low tide. These trees are part of a vast prehistoric forest extending beneath the Irish Sea. Such petrified forests are visible along the Welsh and English coasts too. It is believed that when the ice sheets of the last Ice Age melted, around 5500 BC, that the rising seas drowned the forests.

beach 7 copy

Today the two second classes walked down to the Cove, Greystones. There they created their own forest from clay, drift wood, seaweed and stones in the Cove Greystones When the children left we photographed the tide drowning the forest. These series of photograph will become part of the final art piece.

The weather and tide was perfect and we had a wonderful day thanks to all the help from teachers and parents.

Planning the forest.
Planning the forest.