Rising sea level at the end of the last ice age cut Britain and Ireland off from the rest of Europe.

There is a hidden landscape lying just below the water’s surface. The remains of the 6000 year-old forest can be glimpsed at very low tides, just north of the harbour wall in Bray. Traces of this forest can also be seen in Wales and England.

This is a clue to how drastically different the landscape, the coastline and the sea levels were in the past. The sea we now see from the school was a forest.

Wood generally does not preserve well, but due to the lack of oxygen of being totally submerged, the forest survived. It known as a petrified forest, due to the way it was preserved; the wood has literally been turned to stone. All the organic material in the wood has been replaced by minerals, while retaining its original structure.

Ice age

Today Kelly and Emma’s first class made charcoal drawings of tress to represent the 6000 year-old forest.

They used charcoal, which is made from trees to make their drawings. Some children had never used charcoal before so they spent time exploring the material. They also used rubbers to draw into the charcoal.

Emma’s Class

Kelly’s Class

We had a look at the trees around the school before the children commenced their drawings. The trees they drew are all so individual.These drawings will be put together with work from the other classes which will form the final Artwork.

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Kelly’s Class

Emma’s Class